Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma

Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma is a federally-recognized sovereign Indian tribe, functioning under the constitution and by-laws approved by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior on August 13, 1997. Under Article VIII, Section 1 of the Peoria Constitution, the Peoria Tribal Business Committee is empowered to research and pursue economic and business development opportunities for the Tribe.

The Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma is a confederation of Kaskaskia, Peoria, Piankeshaw and Wea Indians which united into a single tribe in 1854. The tribes which made up the Confederated Peorias, as they then were called, originated in the lands bordering the Great Lakes and drained by the mighty Mississippi. They are Illinois or Illini Indians, descendants of those who created the great mound civilizations in the central United States two to three thousand years ago.

Forced from their ancestral lands in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Missouri, the Peorias were relocated first in Missouri, then in Kansas and, finally, in northeastern Oklahoma. Today they are headquartered in Miami, Ottawa County, Oklahoma.

The increased pressure from white settlers in the 1840’s and 1850’s in Kansas forced the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Piankashaw and Wea Tribes to cooperate with each other to protect these holdings. By the Treaty of May 30, 1854, the US recognized the cooperation and consented to their formal union as the Confederated Peoria. In addition to this recognition, the treaty also provided for the disposition of the lands which allotted each tribal member 160 acres of land. The remaining or “surplus” land was to be sold to settlers and the proceeds to be used by the tribes.

The Civil War was a time of considerable turmoil for all the people of Kansas, especially the Indians. After the war, most members of the Confederation agreed to remove to the Indian Territory under the provisions of the so-called Omnibus Treaty of February 23, 1867. Some of the tribal members were separated from the Confederated Tribes and elected to remain in Kansas to become citizens of the United States.

The land allotted to Confederation members in the Indian Territory were subject to many provisions under the General Allotment Act of 1887. The allotment of all the tribal land was made by 1893, and by 1915, the tribe had no tribal lands or any lands in restricted status. Under the provisions of the Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act of 1936, the tribes adopted a constitution and by-laws, which were ratified on October 10, 1939, and they became known as the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma.

As a result of the “Termination Policy” of the Federal Government in the 1950’s, the Federal Trust relationship over the affairs of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma and its members ended on August 2, 1959, pursuant to the provisions of the Act of August 2, 1956, and Federal services were no longer provided to the individual members of the tribe. However, on May 15, 1978, the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma was reinstated as a federally recognized tribe.

Today the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma are a strong nation which offers many service and has many programs designed to empower their tribal members. These range from beading classes, to educational programs to home ownership and rental assistant programs. They receive revenue through their Peoria Tribal Gaming Commission. They have a Cultural and Language Committee responsible for preserving their native language, culture, and traditions.

http://peoriatribe.com/history/

 

John Froman (Chief)
Tel: (918) 540-2535
Fax: (918) 540-2538
PO Box 1527
Miami, OK74355-1527

Website: http://www.peoriatribe.com

The Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma is a confederation of Kaskaskia, Peoria, Piankeshaw and Wea Indians which united into a single tribe in 1854. The tribes which made up the Confederated Peorias, as they then were called, originated in the lands bordering the Great Lakes and drained by the mighty Mississippi. They are Illinois or Illini Indians, descendants of those who created the great mound civilizations in the central United States two to three thousand years ago.

Forced from their ancestral lands in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Missouri, the Peorias were relocated first in Missouri, then in Kansas and, finally, in northeastern Oklahoma. Today they are headquartered in Miami, Ottawa County, Oklahoma.

The increased pressure from white settlers in the 1840’s and 1850’s in Kansas forced the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Piankashaw and Wea Tribes to cooperate with each other to protect these holdings. By the Treaty of May 30, 1854, the US recognized the cooperation and consented to their formal union as the Confederated Peoria. In addition to this recognition, the treaty also provided for the disposition of the lands which allotted each tribal member 160 acres of land. The remaining or “surplus” land was to be sold to settlers and the proceeds to be used by the tribes.

The Civil War was a time of considerable turmoil for all the people of Kansas, especially the Indians. After the war, most members of the Confederation agreed to remove to the Indian Territory under the provisions of the so-called Omnibus Treaty of February 23, 1867. Some of the tribal members were separated from the Confederated Tribes and elected to remain in Kansas to become citizens of the United States.

The land allotted to Confederation members in the Indian Territory were subject to many provisions under the General Allotment Act of 1887. The allotment of all the tribal land was made by 1893, and by 1915, the tribe had no tribal lands or any lands in restricted status. Under the provisions of the Oklahoma Indian Welfare Act of 1936, the tribes adopted a constitution and by-laws, which were ratified on October 10, 1939, and they became known as the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma.

As a result of the “Termination Policy” of the Federal Government in the 1950’s, the Federal Trust relationship over the affairs of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma and its members ended on August 2, 1959, pursuant to the provisions of the Act of August 2, 1956, and Federal services were no longer provided to the individual members of the tribe. However, on May 15, 1978, the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma was reinstated as a federally recognized tribe.

The Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma is headquartered in Miami, Oklahoma with tribal jurisdiction in Ottawa County.

 

118 S. Eight Tribes Trail

Miami, OK 74354

Traditionally, the Peoria spoke a dialect of the Miami-Illinois language. The name “Peoria” derives from their autonym or name for themselves in the Illinois language, peewaareewa (modern pronunciation peewaalia). Originally it meant, “Comes carrying a pack on his back.”[2] No speakers of the Peoria language survive.[3] Along with the language Miami, a smaller number of the Peoria tribe of Oklahoma speaks Cahokia, Moingwea and Tamaroa.

Current Info:

Today the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma are a strong nation which offers many service and has many programs designed to empower their tribal members. These range from beading classes, to educational programs to home ownership and rental assistant programs. They receive revenue through their Peoria Tribal Gaming Commission. They have a Cultural and Language Committee responsible for preserving their native language, culture, and traditions.

The Peoria issue their own tribal vehicle tags and operate their own housing authority. The tribe owns one casino and the Peoria Ridge Golf Course. The estimated annual economic impact of the tribe is $60 million. Tribal businesses include the Peoria Gaming Center, Buffalo Run Casino and Hotel, and Joe’s Outback are all located in Miami, Oklahoma.

John Froman (Chief)
Tel: (918) 540-2535
Fax: (918) 540-2538
PO Box 1527
Miami, OK74355-1527
Website: http://www.peoriatribe.com

or

118 S. Eight Tribes Trail
Miami, OK 74354