Cultural Competency Course:

Weaving the Threads of Culture, Working Effectively with American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN)

Course Description:

Weaving the Threads of Culture: Working Effectively with American Indians (AI) and Alaskan Natives (AN) is a series of lessons aimed at providing you with the information needed to improve your ability to communicate more effectively with the American Indian/Alaska Native community in which you work as a health provider, health planner, counselor, or however you interact with the native communities. We will provide a view of many aspects of American Indian culture and hopefully remove any stereotypes you may have acquired over your lifetime. Similar to the stages followed when weaving a blanket, a basket or a sash, each of the lessons will depict a different aspect of cultural competence. Just as all of these actions are necessary for the weaving to be a success, the lessons in this cultural competency course are necessary to help you work effectively with American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Learning Objective:
  • Identify components of culture
  • Explain cultural competence
  • Describe the developmental model of intercultural sensitivity
  • Describe key elements of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) culture

 

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Data Into Action for Tribes:

Introduction to Epidemiology

Course Description:

The purpose of the Data Into Action for Tribes: Introduction to Epidemiology course is to provide an overview of basic epidemiology for public health workers, including those working in the field of behavioral health. The primary objective is to increase the knowledge among tribal health departments on how to access available data from federal, state, and local resources for program planning surveillance, and data use. Topics included are basic epidemiology, research questions, measures, study types, interpreting data, epidemiology in Indian country, and behavioral health epidemiology.

Learning Objective:

After completing this course you will be able to…

    • Define the Role of Epidemiology
    • Develop Research Questions
    • Develop Measures
    • Describe the Types of Epidemiology Study Designs
    • Interpret Data
    • Understand the Unique Aspects of Epidemiology in Indian Country and in Behavioral Health

     

 

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Data Into Action for Tribes:

Publicly-Available Data Sources

Course Description:

Data Into Action for Tribes: Publicly-Available Data Sources will provide tribal health departments’ agency staff with information, tools, and resources on how to access available data from federal, state, and local health resources for program planning surveillance, and data use.

Learning Objective:

After completing this course you will be able to…

    • Locate national, publicly-available datasets for health data
    • Describe the usefulness of data to understand the health status of the community
    • Describe strengths and limitations of secondary data for epidemiology use
    • Obtain data from online query systems

 

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Tribal Behavioral Health 104:Culture is Prevention

Collaboration between SPTHB and Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Tribal Behavioral Health 104: Culture is Prevention will inform Tribes, Tribal Serving Organizations and public health professionals about the use of culturally appropriate programs and practices for substance abuse prevention. Examples of success stories from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes’ Tradition Not Addiction Prevention Program will be used to provide valuable examples.This course will inform Tribes, Tribal Serving Organizations and public health professionals about the use of culturally appropriate programs and practices for substance abuse prevention. Examples of success stories from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes’ Tradition Not Addiction Prevention Program will be used to provide valuable examples.

Learning Objectives:
  • Define culturally appropriate programs and practices (Tribal Best Practices)
  • Explain why lack of reliable data for AI/AN is a major barrier to public health interventions
  • Recognize the importance of high quality data to identify AI/AN health and behavioral health disparities
  • Describe the positive response AI/AN have to culturally appropriate messages
  • Identify the real-world strategies, programs and practices that have proven successful in a traditional American Indian Tribe in Central Oklahoma
  • Recognize the need smaller tribes have for epidemiological expertise to help obtain funding and implement relevant programs
  • Identify the existing capacity that exists in all Native Tribes for using Culture as Prevention

 

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